London Road & Snow Hill Partnership

about us

THE LONDON ROAD AND SNOW HILL PARTNERSHIP WAS SET UP BY LOCAL RESIDENTS AND BUSINESS PEOPLE IN 1998 TO HELP REGENERATE THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND WELLBEING IN AN AREA SPLIT BY THE LONDON ROAD.

LRSHP IS A COMPANY LIMITED BY GUARANTEE WITH 60 MEMBERS AND 16 BOARD MEMBERS, ALL OF WHOM ARE VOLUNTEERS.

IT HELPS PROMOTE COMMUNITY PROJECTS AND ENCOURAGES NEW COMMUNITY GROUPS.

WITH FRIENDS OF KENSINGTON MEADOWS, LRSHP HELPS THE COUNCIL MANAGE KENSINGTON MEADOWS PLAYING FIELD AND LOCAL NATURE RESERVE. IT HAS WORKED WITH THE COUNCIL TO KEEP RIVERSIDE YOUTH AND COMMUNITY CENTRE OPEN. IT HAS ENCOURAGED OTHER COMMUNITY CENTRE PROJECTS.

Updates & Posts

Cleveland Bridge – Weight Restriction to be Lifted

Cleveland Bridge – Weight Restriction to be Lifted

Listed Buildings Application No 20/01893/LBA Cleveland Bridge. This council application seeks to repair the weakened Cleveland Bridge, remove the 18 tonne weight limit and once more allow some 1000 Heavy Goods Vehicles per day to pass over this Grade Two Star listed iconic bridge This will impose the ramifications of pollution, noise, vibration, congestion, which are … Continue reading “Cleveland Bridge – Weight Restriction to be Lifted”
Bath Breathes: Clean Air 2021

Bath Breathes: Clean Air 2021

Bath’s clean air zone A class C clean air zone will see charges for most higher emission vehicles driving in the centre of Bath from early 2021 (delayed from Nov 2020). Private cars and motorbikes will not be charged, even if they’re used for work. However, drivers of cars that are 18 years or older (first registered before March 2001 and … Continue reading “Bath Breathes: Clean Air 2021”
Widening Pavements: Social Distancing

Widening Pavements: Social Distancing

Pavement Widening A media release from B&NES: Temporary measures to widen pavements, remove traffic from roads, and improve cycling, will be introduced in parts of the city to help people to socially distance and to encourage a long-term shift in the way people travel around Bath and North East Somerset. Plans to temporarily widen pavements … Continue reading “Widening Pavements: Social Distancing”
Sustainability Survey

Sustainability Survey

A little while back, B&NES Sustainability department published this Survey to collate community-led climate change actions. It is a sensible, constructive step. You may be part of another group or activity which would be relevant to this simple questionnaire: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/BANES_community-led_climate_change_actions …

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Newsletters

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History

1

Fosse Way

The origins of the London Road or the Fosse Way are lost in the mists of antiquity. Almost certainly there must have been a track along the north bank of the adjacent River Avon, perhaps as far back as the Stone Age. What we do know for certain is that the Romans created the 300-kilometre road from Lincoln to Exeter between the years 43 and 51 AD. 

2

Romans

As Roman Bath, or Aquae Sulis (The Waters Of Sulis Minerva) developed as a spa town with its famous baths, the Fosse Way became one of the principal roads of the Roman Province of Britannia. The town of Aquae Sulis was at the centre of the most settled part of the province, with wealth villas and productive farmland all around it. The road must have been busy with both civilian and military traffic, and it is probable that even the Emperors who visited Britannia, including Hadrian, Septimus Severus and Constantine the Great would have visited Bath, coming along the Fosse Way.

3

Saxons

We know little of the events along the Fosse Way during those early Saxon years, but almost certainly, at the end of May in 709 AD, the body of St Aldhelm, England`s first native-born Saxon Saint was carried along the Fosse Way to his final resting place at Malmsbury Abbey.

4

18th Century Bath

By the 1770s the farms and cottages of the old Fosse Way were giving way to the grand terraces of the London Road. Walcot Parade and Walcot Terrace appear in the 1770s. Royal patronage of a type notable in Bath, came with the building of York Villa, where the Grand Old Duke of York kept a bevvy of mistresses. Albemarle Buildings appears in 1789. It was renamed Walcot Buildings in 1803. Kensington appears within the year as does Bath`s last grand development at Grosvenor. Plans for a vast pleasure garden on what is now Kensington Meadow were only thwarted by the sudden bankruptcy of the Bank of Bath in 1793: a banking crash which took much of the city`s wealth with it.

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